Macbook laptop sitting on a brown table with WordPress dashboard open next to a cup of coffee, with the title "Yes, You Want Your Business Site on WordPress" across the lower center of the photo

Yes, You Want Your Business Site on WordPress

WordPress is powering more than a quarter of the web, but many businesses have shied away from taking the leap. Overhauling an entire site to move to a new content management system (CMS) can be intimidating. Businesses have a wide variety of concerns that prevent them from making such a big technology shift–even if the shift would be beneficial in the long-term. There are also a wide variety of myths surrounding what WordPress does and how it can benefit a business (or, rather, how it won’t).

I’m here to give you a few reasons that you want your business site on WordPress:

WordPress isn’t just for blogging

Although those of us in the WordPress industry already know this to be true, there are a lot of non-WordPress folk who still believe WP is just for blogging. Many of them aren’t even clear of what WordPress is.

WordPress provides all kinds of opportunities for your entire site, and it’s not just a place to host thoughts scribbled in a blog. Whether you want a member site, an e-commerce store, or a sleek, beautiful design to represent your company, WordPress can do all of that–and more. Since WordPress is endlessly advancing and changing, the bounds of what it can do are determined by the skill and creativity of the person building on it.

The learning curve is a little steep, but it’s worth it

Although WordPress boasts a five minute install, the average person is going to spend a bit longer setting it up. For someone who doesn’t have the technical savvy, getting a WordPress site set up the way that they want can be a challenge.

Don’t let that stop you from taking it on!

One of the best parts about WordPress is that it’s open source software, which means the source code is available to the public for study, alteration, and distribution. Most of the folks in WordPress are deeply committed to advancing open source software and giving back to the public by making it better and faster. The best and brightest professionals are giving their time to make a free software the absolute best it can be–which benefits all of us.

The work developers do requires expertise and skill, and when you hire them to do the work for your business, you pay for their extensive time and effort. In addition to that, they provide a public service by making WordPress, a free tool, widely beneficial and accessible to everyone. You may hire one developer, but when you work with WordPress, you benefit from the community work of countless brilliant minds.

If you stop and think a moment about all the people who generously give their time and knowledge, often without compensation, to create one of the strongest platforms available, you’ll realize it’s a community worth joining.

Since WordPress enthusiasts, professionals and amateurs alike, are so dedicated to enhancing the software and innovating with the tools provided, there are a ton of resources available for learning how to do what you want to your site. Sites like WPBeginner and WP101 aim to educate people on the fundamentals of WordPress, and if you do some Googling, you’ll easily find a wealth of answers to almost any question you have.

If you’re still worried about that learning curve, many WordPress developers and designers offer WordPress education as a part of their services, so the day to day dealings can be handled by you or your staff without a struggle.

WordPress makes content management easy

Yes, WordPress is a content management system, but that doesn’t just refer to blogging. “Content” describes nearly everything on your site–videos, photos, and text.

As a CMS, WordPress is the absolute best. Once you learn the basic terminology and know where things are in the dashboard, updating your site is easy peasy.

Even if you have a staff of Luddites, teaching them how to handle basic content management in WordPress is super simple! This means your staff will be empowered to make those changes and can handle the content on your site as a part of their duties. This means less oversight from you, which gives you time to focus on running your business. Empowering your staff to use your technology allows you to delegate responsibly and allocate your time to where you need it most.

Integrating with WordPress opens up your audience

One of the ways we’ve helped our clients is by building them their own WordPress plugin. This is particularly helpful for companies that offer a digital product or service and have a target audience that is building out their own business sites.

We have an example of this from our own experience:

Quantcast Corporation is a technology company that provides real-time measurement and analysis of advertising and audience engagement. Quantcast hired us to create a WordPress plugin that puts a JavaScript snippet in the header of their users’ sites. This extended their service out to the greater WordPress community and provided a huge benefit to their existing users. Quantcast users with WordPress websites can install the Audience Analytics plugin. Then, their Quantcast account is linked directly to their WordPress site and they can access their site analytics through WordPress super easily.

WordPress can scale–which means it can grow with your business

To make it do so successfully, though, you’ll definitely need the assistance of a professional. This part gets a little technically advanced, but Smashing Magazine took a look at what different developers have done to set up high traffic sites for success. WordPress isn’t the only key component in the fight to keep your site performant, but it’s not going to be what holds you back.

Getting on WordPress means being in good company

There are tons of businesses and major publications that are on WordPress, including:

  • WorldPay
  • Amazon
  • Disney
  • Politico
  • The NBA
  • Discovery Communications
  • USA Today
  • Microsoft Office Blogs
  • FiveThirtyEight
  • Airbnb

And many, many more. Big names take their technology seriously, and they’ve chosen WordPress to best serve their massive audiences.

So what are you waiting for?

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Five Things I Wish Someone Told Me When I Learned to Code

I haven’t been in the software development industry for loads of time, but thanks to some amazing people who championed my growth, I slingshotted in quicker than some other peers who did it all on their own. (Props to you individuals, by the way, that wrestled it all out by yourself–you are unstoppable!)

After thinking a bit about my experience I came up with five things I wish I had known when I started developing:

1. It’s 100% normal to feel like you’re drowning

I stumbled my way into coding; it initially started as a hobby.

At first, everything was bite-sized and easy. I was blissfully unaware of how little I knew. Once that bubble popped, my lack of knowledge was overwhelming. Everywhere I turned there was something I could not do.

I remember the first time I tried poking around in the Codex. I ran away thirty seconds later because it all seemed like Greek! I literally did not have the capacity or supporting framework to “get it.” I wish I had known in advance how often it would feel like drowning and that it was fine.

2. Just Keep Learning, Just Keep Learning

Go after all the low hanging fruit that you can. It might seem like a waste of time to spread yourself so wide, but if you are truly a newbie and have no context for the developing world, the wider you go, the wider your foundation will be. Although you won’t be fully aware of it at the time, you’ll fill in the gaps of your understanding so you can level up.

When I felt like I was drowning, I continued to chip away at the pieces I could master and walked away from the pieces that made no sense to me. It paid off in the long run.

You can only handle so much drowning before you give up. By moving on, I kept my overload threshold in the green and experienced small wins that boosted my confidence.

Every so often, I would return to the Codex and give it a go again. When it still wasn’t useful for me, I moved on. I remember the day I was working on something, jumped around several Codex pages…and realized it made sense to me. Suddenly, the Codex was in my toolbox. By expanding my understanding in other areas, I built a framework that allowed me to tackle the previously impassable problems.

I wish I had given myself the permission earlier on to move on when it suited me. While there is a satisfaction to mastering something, I have found the field to be so wide, deep, and complex that it is rare to master something the first go around. Spending all your resources to come out utterly defeated is more costly than saying, “I don’t get it, so I’m going to move on to something else and return to it another time.”

It changed my experience from perpetually drowning to recognizing that I need to play in the wading pool a bit longer.

Note: This should go without saying, but don’t put yourself in a situation where you have committed to do something that is beyond your abilities for a client…because then, you don’t have the permission to walk away from it.

3. Hone in on your trusted sources

The internet is amazing and Google a robust resource, but not all of the resources out there are reliable.

As helpful as Stack Overflow is, quality control is not always a guarantee. Many of the solutions provided are hacks, instead of the industry standard approach to the problem. When you’re starting out, it’s hard to know who you should and shouldn’t listen to. It’s imperative to find good sources that you can soak up. This might require reaching out to experts in the business and find out who they trust.

My introduction to coding started with a free online coding tutorial resource. It was great for the most basic things. However, the further I got down the rabbit hole, I discovered that some of what they were teaching was completely wrong. Fortunately, friends who are professional developers pointed me to some credible resources.

It is hard to unlearn something foundational if you learned it wrong the first time. You only have so much time and you can spend eternity reading about all the different approaches.  Find approaches you can build on so it’s not considered time wasted later.

Team Treehouse proved to be an invaluable resource for me. They are trustworthy and they are actually good at teaching–a huge bonus because not all developers are good at breaking down what is natural for them into bite sized pieces for newbies.

4. After you learn it, build it

I cannot tell you how often I’d go through a tutorial and think to myself, “This makes complete sense. I get it!”

I followed with the tutorial and find myself at the end with the desired product. Ta-da! I learned it, right?

More times then I can count, I noticed that stepping away for the weekend would be enough for me to completely forget it. I found that after completing a tutorial, it was really helpful to go through and build the entire project again without the tutorial.

That was the real test of what I had actually learned, versus what I was regurgitating. It is great to follow along with a tutorial, but that’s only the first level. You need to practice it several times before you get it. The more you build it, the more muscle memory you create.

I wish I rebuilt the same things over and over instead of moving on to the next skill before mastering what I initially focused on.

One final point on building: going through other people’s tutorials is a great way to gain knowledge. However, reproducing something that already exists does not activate your creative thinking.

I discovered if I tried to implement a skill in a different context than the tutorial, I understood the steps to build one specific solution, but didn’t always grasp the concept in its entirety and how it could be applied to different situations. After you master a project on your own without the tutorial, try it again but with a different outcome as the goal. This will keep the skill pliable for you.

5. Get excited about pet projects

One of my biggest struggles when learning to code was that I had no idea what to build on my own. I desperately wanted to practice and try things out, but I had zero idea where to start.

As I mentioned earlier, you can only drown for so long before you give up. The antidote to this is passion. If you are really passionate about what you are building, you will have more endurance to push forward when the going gets tough.

Additionally, the great things about pet projects is that they are often side projects. You probably have other pressing matters that need attending, and so your project will get put on the back burner. This is fantastic!

When you return to it you will see your work through the eyes of a new developer. You will learn first hand the importance of commenting because you’ll probably have forgotten about why you did some of what you did and what all the moving pieces do.

As you improve your skills, you’ll find that when you return to your old work, you’ll be embarrassed by some of your approaches. The upside: you’ll have an opportunity to practice refactoring. These skills are super important and less painful to learn on your own project then in a group project where you’re impacting your peers and clients.


I wish I had known all of this sooner.  What about you? What things do you wish your baby developer self knew?